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Showing posts from December, 2013

Identifying virtual disks in Linux on vSphere

A default virtual machine has straightforward hardware. A single SCSI disk on a single SCSI card, for example. Having multiple SCSI disks or cards in a VM creates the need for in-guest identification. Linux complicates matters slightly by using alphabetical disk naming: /dev/sda, /dev/sdb, ... /dev/sdz, /dev/sdaa, /dev/sdab, ... This post looks at how you can identify individual disks in a VMware virtual machine.

Executive summary: VMware notation "X:Y" typically maps onto Linux scsi(X+2), Id:Y, which are then named in ascending order with /dev/sd* identifiers.

which vSphere version is my VM running on?

(an update of an older post, now complete up to vSphere 5.5)

Your Linux runs on a VMware VM, but which on which ESXi version? You can see for yourself: run "dmidecode" and look at lines 10, 11 and 12.
ESX 2.5 - BIOS Release Date: 04/21/2004 - Address 0xE8480 - Size 97152 bytes
ESX 3.0 - BIOS Release Date: 04/17/2006 - Address 0xE7C70 - Size 99216 bytes
ESX 3.5 - BIOS Release Date: 01/30/2008 - Address 0xE7910 - Size 100080 bytes
ESX 4 - BIOS Release Date: 08/15/2008 - Address 0xEA6C0 - Size 88384 bytes
ESX 4U1 - BIOS Release Date: 09/22/2009 - Address 0xEA550 - Size 88752 bytes
ESX 4.1 - BIOS Release Date: 10/13/2009 - Address 0xEA2E0 - Size 89376 bytes
ESXi 5 - BIOS Release Date: 01/07/2011 - Address 0xE72C0 - Size 101696 bytes
ESXi 5.1 - BIOS Release Date: 06/22/2012 - Address: 0xEA0C0 - Size: 89920 bytes
ESXi 5.5 - BIOS Release Date: 07/30/2013 - Address: 0xEA050 - Size: 90032 bytes

NB These DMI properties are set at boot time. Even if your VM gets live-migrated to a host running a…